Posts tagged andrew carnegie.

On This Day in Pittsburgh History: November 25, 1881

Andrew Carnegie made his first move to create a free library for Pittsburgh; he offered $250,000 on the condition that the city government agree to appropriate $15,000 annually for its maintenance. The city was unable to accept the gift as it had no funds on hand for such a purpose. [Historic Pittsburgh

Carnegie Technical Schools, Pittsburgh (via

On This Day in Pittsburgh History: October 6, 1895 

Andrew Carnegie announces his intention to fund a technical institute within the next five years, which will grow to become Carnegie Mellon University. [Wikipedia

On This Day in Pittsburgh History: August 11, 1919

Andrew Carnegie died at age 84 at his summer home in Lenox, Mass., after three days of pneumonia. [Historic Pittsburgh

nprbooks:

"Andrew Carnegie was once the richest man in the world. Coming as a dirt poor kid from Scotland to the U.S., by the 1880s he’d built an empire in steel — and then gave it all away: $60 million to fund a system of 1,689 public libraries across the country."

— Susan Stamberg reports on Carnegie’s library legacy. Read more here.

Photo: Andrew Carnegie, circa 1913. (Library of Congress)

engineeringhistory:

Andrew Carnegie at Engineering Societies Building cornerstone ceremony, 1906

Carnegie Institute ceremony, 1907 (image via Pittsburgh Elders Guild

On This Day in Pittsburgh History: April 11, 1907 

Andrew Carnegie formally presented the $6 million Carnegie Institute in a dedication ceremony witnessed by 20,000. [Historic Pittsburgh

On This Day in Pittsburgh History: March 11, 1901

Andrew Carnegie sold Carnegie Steel to J. P. Morgan for $492 million, making Carnegie the world’s richest man. [Historic PittsburghOn This Day]

“Andrew Carnegie” returns for the closing of the historic Carnegie Building, 1952 (via The Pittsburgh Press)

On This Day in Pittsburgh History: March 1, 1952 

At midnight 100 men of the United States Steel Corporation sat around a horseshoe table in the Carnegie Building, then emptied of all tenants, and drank a toast to what had been “steel headquarters” for 57 years. At 8 a.m., demolition crews began the long and arduous task of disassembling this structure, beam by beam, to clear the site for a Kaufmann’s annex. [Historic Pittsburgh]

On This Day in Pittsburgh History: February 6, 1890

Andrew Carnegie announces he will donate $25.9 million for the establishment of a librarynatural history museum and art museum. [WikipediaThe Willa Cather Archive

On This Day in Pittsburgh History: December 2, 1919

Henry Clay Frick dies at 69, leaving over $2.68 billion, including $26.8 million to the city to develop Frick Park on his estate. Since May, both H. J. Heinz and Andrew Carnegie have died. [Wikipedia]

On This Day in Pittsburgh History: November 25, 1881

Andrew Carnegie made his first move to create a free library for Pittsburgh; he offered $250,000 on the condition that the city government agree to appropriate $15,000 annually for its maintenance. The city was unable to accept the gift as it had no funds on hand for such a purpose. [Historic Pittsburgh

On This Day in Pittsburgh History: November 5, 1896

The first Carnegie International art exhibition was held at Carnegie Institute with 312 paintings on display; 19 Pittsburgh artists were represented. [Historic Pittsburgh

From their 2012 site: 

The first Carnegie International, in 1896, was modeled after the famous and popular art salons held in Europe, but with a broader scope. More importantly, the museum’s first director, John W. Beatty, conceived the Pittsburgh exhibitions as international events, in contrast to the usual practice in the United States where annuals of contemporary art tended to focus almost exclusively on American art.

Establishing a series of annual contemporary art exhibitions in Pittsburgh in 1896 was an extraordinary event in itself. New York City, the nation’s most vital art center, would have been a predictable choice — as would have Philadelphia or Chicago. Moreover, Pittsburgh had no history as an active center for artists or exhibitions. Yet the event quickly became one of the most important contemporary art shows in America.