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Nov. 22, 1956: ”Christmas Parade Downtown Pittsburgh” 
Despite 27-degree weather, thousands of people packed Downtown streets to watch the annual Christmas parade during the noon hour on Thursday, Nov. 22, 1956. 
Leading the way was a Marine Corps color guard and mounted county police officers. Behind them were marching bands. Waving from open-topped cars were the “Santa Belles,” women drawn from the membership of the Pittsburgh Models Club. The women covered their goose bumps by modeling fur coats. 
The Indian Bonnettes, an Oil City unit of baton twirlers who ranged in age from six to 12, weren’t so lucky. The girls’ legs turned a rosy red as they marched and spun in the frosty air. They marched, counter marched and swung batons as though they had lived at the North Pole all their lives, wrote David Martin of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
There was a float with a nativity scene. Also in the procession were 40 mammoth balloons, pulled by boys in clown suits. One balloon was shaped like an ice cream cone. The others were characters such as Humpty Dumpty, Felix the Cat and Jocko the Monkey. Santa Claus and his eight reindeer sat on an 85-foot-long float and brought up the end of the procession. 
Back then, the parade route was different. Participants started in Gateway Center and marched up Liberty Avenue to Fifth Avenue, up Fifth to Grant Street, then down Sixth Avenue to Liberty and back to Gateway Center. 
(Post-Gazette photo)
— Marylynne Pitz

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Nov. 22, 1956: ”Christmas Parade Downtown Pittsburgh” 

Despite 27-degree weather, thousands of people packed Downtown streets to watch the annual Christmas parade during the noon hour on Thursday, Nov. 22, 1956. 

Leading the way was a Marine Corps color guard and mounted county police officers. Behind them were marching bands. Waving from open-topped cars were the “Santa Belles,” women drawn from the membership of the Pittsburgh Models Club. The women covered their goose bumps by modeling fur coats. 

The Indian Bonnettes, an Oil City unit of baton twirlers who ranged in age from six to 12, weren’t so lucky. The girls’ legs turned a rosy red as they marched and spun in the frosty air. They marched, counter marched and swung batons as though they had lived at the North Pole all their lives, wrote David Martin of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

There was a float with a nativity scene. Also in the procession were 40 mammoth balloons, pulled by boys in clown suits. One balloon was shaped like an ice cream cone. The others were characters such as Humpty Dumpty, Felix the Cat and Jocko the Monkey. Santa Claus and his eight reindeer sat on an 85-foot-long float and brought up the end of the procession. 

Back then, the parade route was different. Participants started in Gateway Center and marched up Liberty Avenue to Fifth Avenue, up Fifth to Grant Street, then down Sixth Avenue to Liberty and back to Gateway Center. 

(Post-Gazette photo)

 Marylynne Pitz

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Nov. 25, 1960: “The Day after Thanksgiving”
Black Friday in 1960 was not the busiest shopping day of the year. Although people did go shopping, this part of Downtown photographed on Forbes Avenue, near Stanwix Street was quiet. The Downtown streets were deserted but for a nearly empty bus, a couple of automobiles, a trolley at far right and a lone street cleaner. For many, it was a family day spent at home. 
(Post-Gazette photo)
— Mila Sanina

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Nov. 25, 1960: “The Day after Thanksgiving”

Black Friday in 1960 was not the busiest shopping day of the year. Although people did go shopping, this part of Downtown photographed on Forbes Avenue, near Stanwix Street was quiet. The Downtown streets were deserted but for a nearly empty bus, a couple of automobiles, a trolley at far right and a lone street cleaner. For many, it was a family day spent at home. 

(Post-Gazette photo)

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Nov. 22, 1956: ”Christmas Parade Downtown Pittsburgh” 
Despite 27-degree weather, thousands of people packed Downtown streets to watch the annual Christmas parade during the noon hour on Thursday, Nov. 22, 1956. 
Leading the way was a Marine Corps color guard and mounted county police officers. Behind them were marching bands. Waving from open-topped cars were the “Santa Belles,” women drawn from the membership of the Pittsburgh Models Club. The women covered their goose bumps by modeling fur coats. 
The Indian Bonnettes, an Oil City unit of baton twirlers who ranged in age from six to 12, weren’t so lucky. The girls’ legs turned a rosy red as they marched and spun in the frosty air. They marched, counter marched and swung batons as though they had lived at the North Pole all their lives, wrote David Martin of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
There was a float with a nativity scene. Also in the procession were 40 mammoth balloons, pulled by boys in clown suits. One balloon was shaped like an ice cream cone. The others were characters such as Humpty Dumpty, Felix the Cat and Jocko the Monkey. Santa Claus and his eight reindeer sat on an 85-foot-long float and brought up the end of the procession. 
Back then, the parade route was different. Participants started in Gateway Center and marched up Liberty Avenue to Fifth Avenue, up Fifth to Grant Street, then down Sixth Avenue to Liberty and back to Gateway Center. 
(Post-Gazette photo)
— Marylynne Pitz

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Nov. 22, 1956: ”Christmas Parade Downtown Pittsburgh” 

Despite 27-degree weather, thousands of people packed Downtown streets to watch the annual Christmas parade during the noon hour on Thursday, Nov. 22, 1956. 

Leading the way was a Marine Corps color guard and mounted county police officers. Behind them were marching bands. Waving from open-topped cars were the “Santa Belles,” women drawn from the membership of the Pittsburgh Models Club. The women covered their goose bumps by modeling fur coats. 

The Indian Bonnettes, an Oil City unit of baton twirlers who ranged in age from six to 12, weren’t so lucky. The girls’ legs turned a rosy red as they marched and spun in the frosty air. They marched, counter marched and swung batons as though they had lived at the North Pole all their lives, wrote David Martin of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

There was a float with a nativity scene. Also in the procession were 40 mammoth balloons, pulled by boys in clown suits. One balloon was shaped like an ice cream cone. The others were characters such as Humpty Dumpty, Felix the Cat and Jocko the Monkey. Santa Claus and his eight reindeer sat on an 85-foot-long float and brought up the end of the procession. 

Back then, the parade route was different. Participants started in Gateway Center and marched up Liberty Avenue to Fifth Avenue, up Fifth to Grant Street, then down Sixth Avenue to Liberty and back to Gateway Center. 

(Post-Gazette photo)

 Marylynne Pitz

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Nov. 21, 1945: “Turkeys All Sold”
A timely photo, isn’t it? Thanksgiving is almost here. We found this photo in a “Thanksgiving” folder in our archive and thought it would be a great picture to start this Thanksgiving week as families in Pittsburgh and across the country make plans and preparations for Thanksgiving.
Before Giant Eagle and Walmart came along, before online grocery shopping became possible, back in 1945, Alexander Kidd, owner of the Fort Pitt Butter Company, sold turkeys in the Diamond Market, Downtown Pittsburgh. This photo shows him adding another bird to his display of 87 dressed turkey, previously ordered. This photograph was shot one day before Thanksgiving. 
In 1945, the American people celebrated Thanksgiving in an atmosphere of peace after four long and tragic years of war. On Nov. 12, 1945, President Harry S. Truman wrote a proclamation which said, “In this year of our victory, absolute and final, over German fascism and Japanese militarism; in this time of peace so long awaited, which we are determined with all the United Nations to make permanent; on this day of our abundance, strength, and achievement; let us give thanks to Almighty Providence for these exceeding blessings.”
“We give thanks with the humility of free men,” wrote President Truman, “each knowing it was the might of no one arm but of all together by which we were saved. Liberty knows no race, creed, or class in our country or in the world. In unity we found our first weapon, for without it, both here and abroad, we were doomed. None have known this better than our very gallant dead, none better than their comrade, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Our thanksgiving has the humility of our deep mourning for them, our vast gratitude to them.”
(Sun-Telegraph photo)
— Mila Sanina

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Nov. 21, 1945: “Turkeys All Sold”

A timely photo, isn’t it? Thanksgiving is almost here. We found this photo in a “Thanksgiving” folder in our archive and thought it would be a great picture to start this Thanksgiving week as families in Pittsburgh and across the country make plans and preparations for Thanksgiving.

Before Giant Eagle and Walmart came along, before online grocery shopping became possible, back in 1945, Alexander Kidd, owner of the Fort Pitt Butter Company, sold turkeys in the Diamond Market, Downtown Pittsburgh. This photo shows him adding another bird to his display of 87 dressed turkey, previously ordered. This photograph was shot one day before Thanksgiving. 

In 1945, the American people celebrated Thanksgiving in an atmosphere of peace after four long and tragic years of war. On Nov. 12, 1945, President Harry S. Truman wrote a proclamation which said, “In this year of our victory, absolute and final, over German fascism and Japanese militarism; in this time of peace so long awaited, which we are determined with all the United Nations to make permanent; on this day of our abundance, strength, and achievement; let us give thanks to Almighty Providence for these exceeding blessings.”

“We give thanks with the humility of free men,” wrote President Truman, “each knowing it was the might of no one arm but of all together by which we were saved. Liberty knows no race, creed, or class in our country or in the world. In unity we found our first weapon, for without it, both here and abroad, we were doomed. None have known this better than our very gallant dead, none better than their comrade, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Our thanksgiving has the humility of our deep mourning for them, our vast gratitude to them.”

(Sun-Telegraph photo)

— Mila Sanina